Tiffany (Shiao-Ting) Lin

Intern Therapist

The unpredictability of life often throws challenges at us that can feel too large or too difficult. Perhaps you find yourself asking the question, "Am I able to face this or overcome this?" In my work, I have seen clients discover strength and resiliency within themselves, and find joy and hope again in the midst of really tough situations. My aim is to create a safe space for people to explore their experiences and emotions, and in doing so, be unafraid to be true to themselves. I believe when individuals are able to invite others into those vulnerable spaces, healing and breakthrough follow.  

Professional Qualifications

  • Associate Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (License No. 200.000781)

Education Background

  • M.A. Marriage and Family Therapy, Wheaton College, IL, USA
  • B.A. Child and Adolescent Development, California State University, Fullerton, CA, USA

Clinical Experiences

  • Therapist at Trinity Services, Inc. Family Counseling Center, IL, USA
  • Intake coordinator at Zoe Activation, Taipei, Taiwan

Specialties

  • Self-exploration and development: Our identity and worth are often defined by our environment or societal expectations. We forget to live out, or even intentionally hide, our truest self. I hope by courageously facing and confronting past trauma, hurt, and pain, you'd learn to cherish, advocate and accept your truest, more precious self.
  • Familial relationship: In a family, there are many sub-relationships: the spousal relationship, parent-child relationships, sibling relationships, etc. As these relationships intertwin, conflicts, hurt, and misunderstandings are inevitable. Yet, change can begin with you. When a rock is thrown in the water, it creates a ripple effect; similarly, if you begin to change, your family is bound to change alongside you. Through mutual communication and listening, conflicts can lessen, and each family member will feel a greater sense of belonging.
  • Emotional difficulties: If you have a wound on your body, would you ignore it? Would you place a band-aid over it and pretend like it doesn't exist? Most people would likely take good care of the wound in hopes that it heals quickly. I believe emotional difficulties and wounds should be taken care of in the same way. If you only deal with what's on the surface or brush off certain emotions, these emotions will come back to bother you time after time. Instead of placing a band-aid over the wound and avoiding it, why not spend time and use proper measures to help heal the wound. When you're able to find the root of your emotional problems, strengthen your ability to set healthy boundaries, and not be easily affected by the emotions of others, you can gain greater strength and resources and face and overcome the challenges thrown at you.

Treatment Orientation

  • Bowen Family System Therapy
  • Internal Family Systems

Professional Certificate

  • Prepare & Enrich Facilitator

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